Teaching Yoga on Zoom: My Path to Acceptance

At the start of 2020, I was teaching two yoga classes on Wednesdays at a local dance studio and was about to start a new weekly series for Duke University employees. My calendar was as full as I liked it, with room for other yoga gigs that periodically came my way. This all came to a dead stop in March with our first Covid-19 lockdown. Pandemic-mania meant time for me to take a break. I was not interested in moving my classes online, either with YouTube videos or scheduled Zoom sessions. I felt the Internet was already flooded with good content, much of it affordable or free. I thought “I’ll just wait it out, resume in-person classes when the situation improves.”  Are you laughing along with me?

Teaching yoga at home
On my mat in my “Butterfly Yoga Studio”

By the end of April, the situation was not anywhere near improving and I found that I missed teaching yoga. I missed having a weekly commitment that kept me pro-active and involved — devising new sequences, considering modifications, researching and learning. Most importantly, I REALLY missed my students. I capitulated, purchased a basic Zoom account, and emailed announcements to my local students.

My first class was April 29th and, except for holidays, it has continued weekly. Having spent many hours on conference calls in my corporate life, the Zoom learning curve was short and, luckily, I’ve had very few technical difficulties. But, the teaching experience has been VERY DIFFERENT, in both good and bad ways.
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Touring Egypt on the Verge of a Pandemic: Part 3

Great Pyramids of EgyptBack in Cairo

After a quick flight from Luxor, we landed in  Cairo, checked into the local Marriott, turned around, and went right back out to continue our tour of the ancient wonders: grand houses of worship, the Giza Pyramids and Sphinx, and the Egyptian museum. This was my seventh day in Egypt,  the fifth day on the official tour, and there was still so much to see.
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Touring Egypt on the Verge of a Pandemic: Part 2

The Nile cruise continues

Kom Ombo

On day 2 of our Nile cruise we woke up in Kom Ombo and proceeded to the Graeco-Roman Temple shared by two gods: Horus, the falcon-headed god, and Sobek, the crocodile god.  Yup, a crocodile.  The ancient Egyptians worshipped Sobek as a protection from the dangerous crocodiles that once infested the area. The building has two sides,  symmetrically built with matching courts, halls, and sanctuaries.  You wouldn’t want to show favoritism! Built circa 180–47 BC and damaged by floods and earthquakes, what remains is quite impressive with lots of the carvings still intact. Every surface has some form of symbolic decoration to tell a story or honor a deity. There is an on-site museum with several of the hundreds of mummified crocodiles (!) that were discovered in the area. Continue reading